Ideas for Workshop
8:00-8:15 AM: Welcome and introduction of speakers

8:15-8:30 AM: Overview and Objectives

8:30-9:00 AM: Report significant/interesting statistics involving GLBT individuals, groups or communities

9:00-10:15 AM: Discussion about issues that GLBT people encounter in the workplace

10:15-10:30 AM: Break

10:30-12:00 PM: Review of theories that apply to career counseling for the GLBT community

12:00-1:00 PM: Lunch

1:00-2:00 PM: Open discussion with participants about personal experiences that they have encountered in the workplace and how these situations were handled

2:00-2:30 PM: Discussion about the workplace rights of GLBT individuals

2:30-2:45 PM: Break

2:45-4:00 PM: Discussion about possibilities for future research involving career counseling for the GLBT community and review of current resources for GLBT individuals


Also....here are some links that I thought were powerful and we might like to include:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9osNYnTWA0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVZQSTs52r4 Brian McNight workplace diversity program clip


What about a survey to start the day that includes questions, such as, Have you been discriminated against in the workplace? Have you been out in the workplace? Then we take those who are out and those who are in the closet and mix them up in groups to discuss their experiences.

What about doing a simple Jungian typology test, or some other simplistic and quick inventory which can give a list of occupations that fit the personality types? Then maybe discuss challenges to those types of careers and being gay?

http://similarminds.com/index.html website with free personality tests- seem to be accurate. The Jungian Typology test has a link after you find your type that tells you common liked and disliked occupations by type. We may be able to use this if we plan a workshop in a computer lab.

I was thinking that throughout the workshop it will be very important to have opportunities for people to meet and discuss issues with one another. When you are just coming out to yourself, and to other people, you tend to think you are alone in the world. You dont know how to talk to people, and are often nervous around other LGBTs. Maybe this is no longer as true as it was in the past, but I think it will be true for people coming out later in life. Structuring discussions may be able to help some people with the coming out process. It will also allow for networking, and helping people to find out area employers who we as presenters may not know about, who are gay-friendly or offer anti-discrimination policies.

http://careerservices.rutgers.edu/gayandlesbian.shtml

pdf file/handout that explains the SIF


http://www.outforwork.org/